It’s about Thyme - Cambridge Weight Plan
Recipe of the Week: Pizza!
October 8, 2017

It’s about Thyme

Thyme is not a herb I use all the Thyme… Its active ingredient thymol has so many amazing health benefits, the ability to prevent viral and fungal infections which has a positive impact on the immune system. Thyme has one of the highest concentrations of antioxidants compared to other herbs. It has been used for centuries for health and wellness, such as improving circulation, it’s blend of antioxidants vitamins and minerals such as potassium and manganese are extremely beneficial for heart health. Regularly incorporated in to your diet it has been known to reduce stress.

Thyme is most commonly known for its use in respiratory health; assisting with bronchitis, asthma, colds and flus, blocked sinuses and seasonal allergies as thyme acts as an anti-inflammatory and expectorant. For hundreds of years it has been brewed as a tea, used in baths, applied topically with an oil mixture and of course eaten. I thought it was Thymely to mention this now with those suffering with seasonal allergies,

Let’s get down to the interesting stuff how to use it in cooking. Whilst cooking with thyme fresh is always best! It should always be added in to the pan first with a little drizzle of oil this help release that beautiful flavour. It is fantastic used on roasted vegetables, in pasta sauces and on oven roasted white fish. It also blends perfectly with sage and rosemary for red meats. We also use it in stews and chicken and vegetable soup.

Do you have any other interesting uses for Thyme? Try adding it to a few of your meals this week and let me know what you’ve created!!

As I mentioned in last week’s blog my challenge for my lifestyle spring clean was to restart my veggie/herb garden, as my son is home on school holidays we did just that! It was great to get him involved from which vegetable and herb plants to purchase right through to building the garden and planting. He has also been out every day watering them.

What did you do this week for your lifestyle spring clean?

References
Bozkurt, E., Atmaca, H., Kisim, A., Uzunoglu, S., Uslu, R., & Karaca, B. (2012). Effects of thymus serpyllum extract on cell proliferation, apoptosis and epigenetic events in human breast cancer cells [abstract]. Nutrition and Cancer, Volume 64, Issue 8, 2012, pages 1245-1250. Retrieved from http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/01635581.2012.719658#.Ul_MYWTk-z5

Dunn, B. (2013, May 10). A brief history of thyme. Retrieved from http://www.history.com/news/hungry-history/a-brief-history-of-thyme

Gordo, J., Máximo, P., Cabrita, E., Lourenço, A., Oliva, A., Almeida, J., … Cruz H. (2012, November). Thymus mastichina: chemical constituents and their anti-cancer activity [abstract]. Natural Products Communications. 7(11):1491-4. Retrieved from http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23285814

Grieve, M. (1931). A Modern Herbal. Retrieved from http://botanical.com/botanical/mgmh/t/thygar16.html

Palaniappan, K., & Holley, R.A. (2010, June). Use of natural antimicrobials to increase antibiotic sucseptibility of drug resistant bacteria. International Journal of Food Microbiology. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijfoodmicro.2010.04.001. Retrieved from http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0168160510001868

Thyme Thymus vulgaris. (n.d.). Retrieved from http://www.hippocratesmedicine.com/thyme/

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